HOW TO CHOOSE A THERAPIST

If you suffer from panic attacks, you will most likely make the most progress if you look for a therapist who specializes in Anxiety and Panic Disorder.   Many clients come to Century City Panic Attack Center, extremely discouraged because they have already tried a variety of counselors, therapists and psychiatrists– and yet they are still suffering.

Generalists sometimes do not possess the knowledge necessary to specifically target the panic attacks directly.   Panic attack treatment is specific.  As mentioned, panic attacks do not just come out of the blue.  There is always a specific trigger, conscious or unconscious… a thought, an event, an anticipated image.   Panic attacks do not occur simply as a result of general stress in a person’s life.

When you’re looking for a therapist, that individual may be a Marriage and Family Therapist, a Social Worker, or a Psychologist.   The educational training varies for each college degree, but there is no college degree that is better than any other.

You may want to interview the therapist on the phone before making an appointment.  Try asking these questions:   Do you specialize in panic attacks and anxiety?   Can you tell me what is the root cause of panic attacks — or do you feel that they just appear suddenly, out of the blue?   How do you work specifically with the panic attacks?

As you listen to the answers the therapist gives you, trust your gut.  Therapists are like any service professionals — like any doctor, or mechanic.  There are good ones, and not so good ones.  If you feel uncomfortable speaking with that therapist, don’t question your instincts — just move on, and call someone else.   On the other hand, if the therapist answers your questions carefully, logically, and specifically —  give it a go.

One more note:   when you are in session with your therapist, you should feel taken care of, and emotionally safe.   If you don’t, if you feel more fearful in that person’s presence, or intimidated, or disconnected — then perhaps it’s the wrong “fit.”

As a therapist, my job is to make you feel safe and secure.  You can rest assured that you will not experience any form of judgment — instead, you will find that you are able to be totally honest with me.   My goal in our therapy room is always to create a nurturing place of unconditional acceptance.

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